CENTURY 21 CUDDY



Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 8/13/2017

It’s a long road to get to the status of being a homeowner. Once all of the i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed at closing, you’ll be handed the keys to your wonderful new place to live. Now, you’ll have a huge responsibility on your hands as well. You’ll need to pay the mortgage monthly. You’ll need to perform regular maintenance around the home. You’ll also need to pay for things like home insurance, utilities, and more. Everything that happens in your home when you have those keys is your responsibility. 


Once you have unpacked and settled into your new place, there’s a seemingly unending amount of things to do including organizing, unpacking, painting, decorating, cleaning, renovating, and so much more. You really need to take a break from all of that and take the time to bask in the glory of homeownership for a few minutes.        


Know What You Have Accomplished


Buying a home is not something that every person can achieve. It takes a lot of hard work, dedication, and persistence to save up money, find a home you love, and close the deal. You’ll also learn a lot through the process of buying a home. You’ve established a sense of independence and freedom through buying a home; you’re truly living the American Dream. 


You Have Something To Call Your Own


As a homeowner, you are not the master of your own domain. Anything that you wish is your command. Any hobbies you have, whatever type of decorations you want, and the types of chairs you like to sit in are all your choice in your own home. Once you own a home you don’t need to worry about the unruly neighbors upstairs or the landlord who wouldn’t ket you paint the walls. Do you want to plant a vegetable garden in your yard? You can! There’s no one there to tell you that you can’t. Have a blast using your yard and your home the exact way that you want it. Now you can feel free to have friends over and entertain to your heart’s content. This is one of the best parts of owning a home.


You Now Have A Better Financial Future


Buying a home is a smart investment. You’re contributing positively to your financial future. Every mortgage payment that you make is contributing to something that you own. There’s no security deposits and no fees for your pets. The longer you live in your home, the more equity that you’re building up since your property is increasing in value over time. If you continue to make timely payments and upkeep your home properly, you’ll be able to really see a return on your initial investment on the home.  

    





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Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 8/6/2017

Seeing your desire to buy a waterfront property through is a big accomplishment. Before you sign on the dotted lines, there are a few things that you should know about the process of choosing the perfect waterfront property for you. 


Decide What You Need


The first step in finding the right property of any kind is understanding your own needs. How do you want to use the property? Will it be your year-round home, or will you be there only a portion of the year? Really map out what your priorities are when it comes to searching for waterfront properties. From here, you can figure out what areas you’d like to search in and what type of property you want to find to suit you. What types of activities will you be doing at your property? Will a lake property do the job or do you need an ocean escape? Is canoeing or kayaking a part of your dream, or is simply sitting by the water enough enjoyment for your needs? Answering all of these questions can help you to narrow down your needs for a waterfront property. 


Touring Properties


As with any other type of home search, you should take the time to scope out the properties that you’re interested in. This means not only looking at the properties themselves but looking at the communities and neighborhoods as well. What does the area have to offer you? Is it near a town or nestled away in a secluded spot? Remember that with a typical house the size of the home is what contributes to the majority of the value of the home. With a waterfront property, the surroundings are key. The closer to the water you are, the more valuable your piece of real estate is. Consider all of the typical factors when looking at properties along with the additional concerns of being close to the amenities and natural pleasures that you crave. 


Other Important Things To Consider


Other things that you should consider in finding your perfect piece of waterfront heaven are things like:


  • How close is the beach?
  • Does the beach or lake have easy access?
  • Is there an adequate amount of privacy at this property?
  • What kind of view is there?


The more breathtaking the views and the more space between you and your neighbors will give you an advantage not only in your own living situation but in renting out the property and even selling it in the future. 


There are a lot of things that go into making the decision of finding the right waterfront property. Sometimes, hiring an experienced realtor in the area can be just what you need to understand all the aspects of your investment from the area to the type of home you choose. Don’t be afraid to hire an experienced realtor to help you in your search.   






Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 7/30/2017

The process of closing on a home can seem lengthy and complex if it’s your first time buying or selling a house. There are several costs and fees required to close on a home, and while it’s up to the individuals to decide who covers what costs, there are some conventions to follow.

In this article, we’re going to talk about closing costs for selling a house and signing on a mortgage. We’ll discuss who pays what, and whether there is room for negotiation within the various fees and expenses.

But first, let’s talk a little bit about what closing costs are and what to expect when you start the process of buying or selling a home.

Closing costs, simplified

If you’re just now entering the real estate market, the good news is you can often estimate your closing costs based on the value of the property in question. You can ask your real estate agent relatively early on in the process for a ballpark figure of your costs.

Closing costs will vary depending on the circumstances of your sale and the area you live in. In some cases, closing costs can be bundled into your mortgage, such as in “No Closing Cost Mortgages.” However, avoiding having to deal with closing costs often comes at the expense of a slightly higher interest rate.

If you are planning to buy a house and have recently applied for a mortgage, laws require that your lender sends you an estimate of your closing costs within a few days of your application.

Now that we know how closing costs work, let’s take a look at who plays what.

Buyer closing costs

In terms of the sheer number of closing costs, buyers tend to have the most to deal with. Fortunately, your real estate agent will help you navigate these costs and simplify the process.

They can range from two to five percent of the cost of the sale price of the home. However, be sure to check with your lender for the closest estimate of your closing costs. It’s a good idea to shop around for mortgage lenders based on interest rates as well as closing costs charged by the lender.

Here are some of the costs you might be asked to pay as a home buyer:

  • Appraisal fees

  • Attorney fees

  • Origination fees

  • Prepaid interest or discount points

  • Home inspection fee

  • Insurance and Escrow deposits

  • Recording fees

  • Underwriting fees

Seller Closing Costs

While the seller pays a larger amount of closing costs, sellers still have obligations at closing that can be just as expensive. The biggest expense for sellers is to pay the real estate commission. Commission usually falls in the vicinity of 6% of the sale price of the home. This covers the commission of both the seller’s and the buyer’s real estate agents. 


The main takeaway? Buyers and sellers both share the burden of closing costs. While the buyer has more expenses to take care of, the seller pays for the largest costs.





Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 7/23/2017

Pets have different grooming and dietary needs as well as different exercise and social habits. Just like humans, pets also have diverse temperaments and personalities. Own a large Rottweiler or German Shepherd and you may be better off living in a house that has a large back yard, as these dogs need lots of room to roam, play and exercise to thrive. Smaller pets, like a Chihuahua or a Beagle, may be easier to groom but drive your neighbors nuts with their constant barking while you’re away. Each of these dogs looks cute while a puppy. Yet, each requires regular care. If you’re a busy homeowner who’s looking for a perfect pet to call your own, consider these pets: • Turtles – Choices available to you for pet turtles include land and water turtles. Some small turtles, like the red ear slider live 40 or more years. Large, land turtles can live hundreds of years. If you get a water turtle, upgrade the tank or aquarium as the turtle grows. Make sure that the aquarium is large enough for the turtle to swim freely in. You may have to clean the tank once a month, depending on the filters that you use. • Fish – Similar to turtles, fish are relatively easy to care for. There are small fish that have lived several years, especially when given good care and affection. Avoid over feeding fish. Have fun decorating their tank and watching them swim and play. • Cats – While kittens, these pets rarely stay still, pouncing on nearly anything that moves. Grown cats tend to be independent and can keep themselves quite entertained. Yet, they do appreciate and enjoy love and affection just like other pets. A litter box, cat food, scratching rod, toys, perching area and a sleeping bed are items that cats need. • Dogs that don’t bark a lot – Pugs, Chinese Shar-Peis, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, whippets and golden retrievers are amongst dogs low on the barking scale. These dogs offer companionship without keeping you or the neighbors jittery or up at night. • Hamster – The lifespan for a hamster is about two to three years. These animals are small, needing little room for play and exercise. They especially make good pets for young children. Because they can stay in a cage, you won’t have to worry about them messing up your house. They can also look out for themselves while you’re at work. • Parrots – This is another pet that can stay in a cage while you are away. Parrots can live up to 80 years. Opt for a cage that gives a parrot room to fly. Consider taking the bird outdoors in a cage once a week. They don’t talk. They rarely cry and you won’t hear them complain, but pets have needs, both physical and emotional. Before buying a pet, ask a pet store clerk to tell you the grooming, exercise and daily care that the pet you’re thinking about getting needs. You can also read books or search the web to find information about the particular pet you’re thinking about bringing home. Avoid getting a pet simply because your kids beg you to. Make sure that your everyone in your family wants the pet and will do her or his part to help care for and clean up after the pet.




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Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 7/16/2017

You’ve visited a city and absolutely love the area. The food, entertainment, people,culture and sights attract you each time you stay in the city. It’s no wonder that you’re thinking about buying a vacation home in the area. But, you won’t be living there year round. Because of that, consider these points before you invest in a vacation home.

Weather

What is the weather like in the city, particularly during off peak seasons? Are winters harsh, dropping forty or more feet of snow a year? If so, that could put significant wear on the roof of your vacation home. Yet, harsh weather isn’t a reason to turn away from buying the house. You could protect your house from hard weather conditions by installing storm windows, inspecting and repairing roofing and patching sidewalks and driveways before you leave at the end of summer.

Home Owners Association Rules

If your vacation house falls under a Home Owners Association, meet with association leaders to ensure that you understand applicable rules and fees. Get clear about rules and fees before you buy the house.

Count Up the Costs

As with other real estate, there will be property taxes, insurance and maintenance costs associated with your vacation house. Are you ready to take on these extra expenses, in addition to covering expenses at your permanent residence, expenses like food, clothing, entertainment and commuting costs? If not,staying at a hotel or resort may work better for you.

Furnishing Your Vacation Home

Unless you buy a house that comes fully furnished, factor in how much money you’re willing to pay to furnish the home. Keep furnishings to a minimal, steering clear of putting too many valuables in the house, as it could reduce the amount of money you’d be out of should the house get burglarized while you’re away.

Neighborhood

Get to know the neighbors. They could keep an eye on your vacation home while you’re away. You’ll also want to make sure that you get along with your neighbors. A good way to learn more about your neighbors is to stay in the city for a week or longer several times. Attend local events and stay abreast of local news the same as you would if you were going to live in the city year round.

Income Options

Rent out your vacation home while you’re away and you could generate income off the property.Check out local renting laws first. Also, run a thorough background check on people you’re thinking about renting the property out to.

Other points to consider include how much time you expect to spend at your vacation home. If you only plan to stay in the area for two to three weeks during the summer, it may not prove to be a smart investment unless you rent the house out while you’re away. Definitely install a security alarm at your vacation home and post signs on windows and doors, letting people know that the house is under surveillance.




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