CENTURY 21 CUDDY



Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 10/8/2017

There’s many different myths about buying a home that may have been presented to you as fact. All of these rumors could have you believing that being a home owner is a dream. Here, we’ll debunk some of the most common misconceptions about home buying and give you the tools to solve any issues that you may come across in the process of securing a home loan.


If You Don’t Have 20% To Put Down On A Home, You Can’t Buy


Many conventional loans do require a 20% down payment on a home. There’s also many different loans available that may suit your needs. From Federal Housing Administration loans to Veteran’s programs to down payment assistance programs, there’s many different things that can be done to help you buy a home. Keep in mind that any time you put less than 20% down, you’ll need to provide additional mortgage insurance, also known as PMI or private mortgage insurance.  


If Your Credit Score Is Terrible You’re Out Of Luck

If you want really good mortgage rates, having great credit is very important. If your credit score is low, your rates tend to be much higher. A really low credit score could keep you from getting a loan completely. FHA loans allow you to still qualify for a loan with a credit score as low as 580.


You Need To Make Bank To Get Money From The Bank


Monthly annual income is just one of the factors that’s considered when it comes to getting a loan to purchase a home. Your debts matter just as much if not more. People with significant credit card debt and other loans may be denied a home loan even if they have a substantial income. 


You’re In The Clear If You’re Pre-Qualified


Pre-qualification is much different than pre-approval. Pre-qualification involves giving your lender basic information about your finances in order to estimate how much of a loan you can get. This will give you a ballpark figure of about how much you’ll be able to borrow. Of course, this is very helpful in the home search process, but you’re not done. To get pre-approved, you’ll need a complete mortgage application in order to have your complete financial background check and credit rating.  


If You’ve Met One Real Estate Agent, You’ve Met Them All


This couldn’t be further from the truth. Your relationship with your real estate agent is going to be quite close. You’ll need to share somewhat personal information in order to secure a house you’ll love. Agents are involved in one of the biggest decisions that you’ll ever make. Each agent has his or her specialties and knows different neighborhoods better than others. Definitely go with a real estate agent that you feel comfortable with and knows their stuff.  


Closing Costs Aren’t Your Responsibility


Sometimes, sellers do pay the closing costs in the sale of a home. It all depends upon how the negotiations go with the home. You’ll need to be prepared for upfront costs in buying a home. These include a credit check, attorney fees and property insurance. As a buyer, you’ll be paying anywhere between 2 and 5 percent of the purchase price of the home.  


It’s important to be prepared and to stay informed in order to make sound financial decisions throughout the process of purchasing a home. Everything will be that much more exciting when you have all of the pertinent information that you’ll need.





Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 4/2/2017

Securing the best mortgage for your home may seem challenging, particularly for those who are first-time homebuyers. Fortunately, we're here to help you get the best possible mortgage rate, regardless of the real estate market. Here are three tips that you can use to get the best mortgage rate at any time: 1. Find Ways to Improve Your Credit Score. Your credit score likely will influence your mortgage rate. However, those who track their credit score closely can improve this score over an extended period of time. That way, when the time comes to secure a mortgage for a new home, you'll be in great position to get the best mortgage rate possible. Try to check your credit score regularly. You can do so quickly and easily, as you're entitled to one free copy of your credit report every 12 months from each of the three nationwide credit reporting companies (Equifax, Experian and Trans Union). To improve your credit score, focus on paying off any outstanding debt. This will help you enhance your credit score without delay. 2. Take Advantage of a Shorter-Term Mortgage. Although you may consider a variety of mortgage options, a shorter-term mortgage may allow you to pay a lower mortgage rate for a shorter period of time. Remember, just because you choose a 15-year mortgage over a 30-year mortgage does not mean you will wind up paying twice as much for your mortgage payment each month. For example, selecting a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage over a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage may prove to be a viable option for many homebuyers. A 15-year fixed-rate mortgage will have higher principal and interest totals than a 30-year counterpart, while the insurance and tax fees associated with both types of mortgages will remain the same. 3. Look at All of the Lending Options That Are Available. It sometimes can be overwhelming to look at all of the banks, credit unions and other lending options that provide mortgage assistance. Diligent homebuyers, however, will dedicate the time and resources necessary to explore all of the lending options at their disposal to make an informed decision. Ideally, you should try to get multiple quotes from a variety of lenders. This will enable you to see exactly what each lender has to offer and improve your chances of making the best decision possible. Lastly, don't forget to lock in your mortgage rate in writing. By doing so, you'll be able to verify you have the mortgage rate you like and the loan you need to secure your dream home. Understanding the ins and outs of landing the ideal mortgage rate can be difficult. And if you ever have concerns or questions along the way, your real estate agent may be able to point you in the right direction as well. Because this agent boasts comprehensive real estate sector experience, he or she may be able to provide guidance and tips to ensure that you can find a reliable lender and land a great mortgage rate. Find a mortgage rate that works for you, and you may be able to save money over the life of your mortgage.





Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 1/22/2017

Everyone knows that their credit score will affect the mortgage they qualify for and the interest rate they receive. The details of how exactly those numbers are arrived at, however, are a bit hazy for the average prospective homeowner.

This confusion is due to a number of reasons. Chief among them is the fact that your average person isn’t well-versed in credit terminology or the variables that go into determining their credit scores.

In this article, I’m going to break down credit scores and credit bureaus, then discuss how each of them affects the mortgage rate you could receive. Then, we’ll talk about some ways you can boost your score to qualify for a better rate.

Anatomy of a credit score

Credit scores are determined by five main variables. In order of importance, they are:

  • 35%: your payment history on loans, bills, credit cards, etc.

  • 30%: your total debt amount for all of your accounts

  • 15%: length of your credit history (how long you’ve had open accounts for loans, credit cards, etc.)

  • 10%: types of credit you have used (auto loan, student loan, credit card… diversity of loans matters)

  • 10%: recent credit inquiries (such as taking out new loans or opening new credit cards)

To have a “good” (over 700) or “excellent” (over 750) credit score, you’ll need to focus on each of these factors. For most people, paying their bills on time over a long enough timeline is enough to get them into the excellent range.

But things happen in life. People forget to pay an important bill, they have financial emergencies, or they have to take out a loan for an unforeseeable expense.

The credit bureaus

So, who are the people that determine your credit score?

There are three main credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Lenders will look at reports from all three bureaus to determine your rate. Due to the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003, consumers are able to receive a free copy of their credit report from each bureau once per year.

Since then, companies like Credit Karma have made credit reports even more accessible. Users are able to check in on their credit as often as they want free of charge.

Since much of your credit score is out of your hands, at least in the short-term, what can you do to help boost your score over the next few months to increase your chances of getting a good interest rate on your loan? Two things.

Credit and mortgages

So, just how much of an impact does your credit score have on your mortgage rate? Having an excellent score can give you a full percentage point lower on your monthly interest rate.

One percent doesn’t seem like much, but over the period of a 30-year loan that can amount to tens of thousands of dollars that you could have saved if you had a better credit score. As you can imagine, having an extra $2,000 per year can be quite helpful to a new homeowner.

So, what can you do to boost your score?

Make corrections

Since you have access to free credit reports be sure to go through your detailed report a few months before you plan to apply for a mortgage. Report any harmful errors to help you increase your score.

Don’t apply for new credit

The period from now until you apply for a mortgage is an important one. If you make new credit inquiries (i.e., open up new credit cards, take out new loans, etc.), your score will temporarily decrease. Wait until after you sign on your mortgage to take out other loans.




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