CENTURY 21 CUDDY



Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 4/14/2019

Deciding to put up a fence on your property may seem like a simple decision, but there are a lot of things to consider before hiring a contractor to get it done.

One question to ponder is whether your neighbors might be offended or annoyed by the sudden appearance of a fence near the edge of their property. The answer to that question would partly depend on your relationship with your neighbor, the size of your lot, and whether the fence is tasteful or an eyesore. The problem with that standard is that "tasteful" is in the eyes of the beholder!

Tall fences can and sometimes do have a way of changing the look and feel of your immediate neighborhood, so the installation of a fence could potentially cause resentment from other property owners. The decision to put up a fence on your property is a personal one, but there's also a lot of value in maintaining friendly neighbor relations. (It can be a delicate balance!)

One Step at a Time

In some places, local ordinances or Homeowner Association rules may impose restrictions on fences and other structures. Many towns and municipalities require that you (or your contractor) obtain a building permit before putting up a fence, so a quick phone call or email to the appropriate local official can shed light on requirements, restrictions, and other assorted rigmarole!

Since the cost of installing a fence can easily run into the thousands, it always pays to get a few estimates and proposals from reputable fence companies. Other decisions include choosing the best height and composition of the fence. Fencing materials range from metal and chain link to vinyl and wood. Composite fencing materials are also an option.

Your choice will depend on a lot of factors, including cost, durability, maintenance aspects, and appearance. Online information, free brochures, and meetings with contractors can help you learn more and make an informed decision.

Once you've moved beyond the potential issues of installing a fence on your property, there are several distinct advantages to fencing in your back yard.

  • Enhanced privacy: While "privacy" can mean different things to different people, a tall fence offers an immediate solution to a variety of privacy-related problems. 
  • Pet containment: If you don't always have the time or energy to take your dog(s) for a walk in the neighborhood, it's a major convenience to be able to let them out in a contained area to relieve themselves and get a little fresh air. It can also be a good way to keep them safe and out of trouble!
  • Wildlife barrier: Although there are often gaps at the bottom of fences that prevent fences from being completely wildlife-proof, a properly installed fence can drastically reduce the chances of wildlife sneaking their way into your back yard. Whether you want to protect your vegetable garden or pets from wild animals, a solid fence can be the barrier that you need.
  • Increased security: While fences are not always an impervious barrier to burglars, trespassers, and other intruders, it does provide some protection from those potential threats.
If you're searching for a new home or looking to improve your existing property, the right kind of fence can provide you and your family with a myriad of benefits.




Categories: fences  


Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 4/7/2019

First-time homebuyers are prone to making a lot of mistakes when it comes to picking a home, due to many reasons—one of which is just plain old inexperience. If you plan to buy your first home soon, these are a few things you want to avoid.

  1. Not having a budget. It might surprise you to know but a lot of first time home buyers don’t have a spending budget before they start looking. Or sometimes, they look at houses that are way over what they can afford and end up spelling more money than they ought to. It's always better to clearly define what you are willing to spend on the new house and stick with it. That way you have a more comprehensive search scope that you can share with your realtor.
  2. Being overly emotional. Sometimes you see a house that looks like the builder intentionally had you in mind. But sometimes it's better to put your emotions in check because it might reduce your bargaining power with the seller. Being too excited might even make you oblivious to specific reasons why the home may not be a good fit for you.
  3. Not factoring additional costs of renovations and home improvements. Having a budget and firmly sticking to it is not enough, you also have to take into consideration the costs of any home additions or repair work you think of doing. You want to change the lamp fixtures or faucets in the showers? Be prepared to spend a little more.
  4. Underestimating the costs of maintaining the home. Sure, you get to buy the house at a giveaway price but have you stopped to consider what it will cost you to keep the house in that condition? Lots of first time home buyers don't do this. Electricity bill, gas bill cable bills, and even homeowner association fees are things that any home buyer should consider before concluding on any deal.
  5. Not hiring an agent. Winging it on your own is probably the most common mistake first-time buyers make. In a bid to save some money, they neglect to hire an agent of their own and choose to work directly with the seller or even worse, the seller’s agent themselves. More likely than not, what’s going to happen is a novice buyer who finds himself outclassed by an experienced salesperson.

Whatever you do, avoid these mistakes by contacting a real estate professional in your area.





Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 3/31/2019

There are many benefits to installing a security system in your home. It gives you a sense security and safety for you and your family. You’ll be able to be away from your home for both short and long periods with a peace of mind. The one choice you’ll need to make is the type of security system that you want to be installed in your home. Some alarms are manned by commandoes while others have much more simplistic designs.   


While some systems are installed by a professional, others are easier to install and can be done with a DIY approach. Remember that you can always start small and install a more complicated system as time goes on. You don’t even need to know how to use a drill or have any kind of technical expertise for most DIY install security systems. Below, you’ll find the basic steps that you should know before you install a home security system.


Basic Components In Your Home Security Package


  • The main panel complete with keypad
  • Sensors
  • Motion detectors


These are the basic things that will come with every home security system no matter how simple or fancy you get in your alarm system selection. The number of sensors that you need will depend on the number of doors and windows that are in your home. It also is based on your own personal preference. Remember that these sensors will be activated every time a door or window is opened when they are installed in your home. 

 

Install The Security Panel


Security panels are often wireless and should be placed near a power source to plug the panel in. These should also have a backup battery of some sorts. You can either place a nail on the wall or put an adhesive on the back of the panel. It’s really that simple to put the panel up!


Install The Sensors In Your Home


Security systems will come with door and window sensors and possibly along with some motion detectors. They will be placed with a moveable adhesive for your convenience. Every security system will come along with instructions for the optimum locations to place these sensors in. 


Test Your System


Once you have completed the above steps, you’ll need to test your system to ensure that it has been properly activated and that everything is working properly. The specific system that you’re installing should also come along with some instructions for testing purposes. 


While DIY home security systems seem fairly simple, they aren’t for everyone. Some homeowners prefer more complex systems to suit their needs. If a professional installation is for you, you should avoid self-install security systems altogether.    


 




Categories: diy   home security  


Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 3/24/2019

Picking out flowers to plant in your garden and around your home is no easy task. You’ll have to consider the hardiness of the plants, whether you want them to come back year after year, what colors complement your house, and so on.

 Most people just simply buy flowers that look pretty. And while you can get lucky and have healthy flowers that way, a better method is to think about what you’re looking for in a flower.

 In this article, we’re going to help you choose the right flowers for your home and lifestyle.

 Annuals, biennials, and perennials

One of the first things you should consider is the lifecycle of the flowers. If you don’t want to go through the trouble of choosing and planting new flowers every year or two, perennials may be the best choice for you. Over the long run, you can save money by planting and caring for perennials. However, in the short term, annuals tend to be cheaper to buy.

Planting perennials

If you do decide to go with perennials in your garden you’ll need to be careful about which ones you choose. Make sure to look up your plant hardiness zone and only buy flowers that can withstand the colder seasons in your region.

Furthermore, you’ll want to see if there is any special care required to keep your flowers coming back each year. Likely, you’ll have to spend a bit of time aerating and fertilizing your soil to maintain a supply of nutrients to your plants’ roots. Similarly, determine if there is any special care that you can provide in the winter to help the plants return to life next spring.

Planting annuals

Annuals tend to be some of the brightest and most beautiful flowers. Some of them, called “volunteers,” can sow their own seeds easily and return the next year with minimum work on your part.

You might also notice that annuals bloom throughout the season. That means you and you family and house guests have more time to marvel at the beautiful flowers they produce.

Some common annuals to plant are begonias, geraniums, marigolds, sunflowers and petunias. If you like to keep a variety.

Planting biennials

Like annuals, biennials will die after they bloom. The key difference is that they last for two years not one. During spring of the first year they will grow and stem but won’t bloom. The following spring is when biennials reach their peak.

 Just like annuals, biennials can sow their own seeds. However, some are easier to grow than others and you’ll want to encourage them with rich, aerated soil and plenty of water in early spring.

 Some common biennials include Black-eyed Susans, Sweet William, Forget-Me-Not, and some garden variety plants like fennel, carrot, and parsley.

 Pest-repelling plants

There’s more to flowers than just their ability to look and smell nice. Some plants have the ability to repel certain pests. 

Marigold can repel certain insects as well as rabbits, chives repel certain beetles and flies, petunias repel aphids (which can wreak havoc in your vegetable garden), and so on. 

If you have a pest problem and want to dissuade them from coming back next year, planting pest-repelling plants may be the best option for you.




Tags: Garden   flowers  
Categories: flowers   gardening  


Posted by CENTURY 21 CUDDY on 3/23/2019

Open House, Sunday 3/24, 12 to 2 PM. Ledgemere Country Townhomes, one of Ashland's most desirable places to live. Beautifully Maintained w/many updates. Fantastic Cook's kitchen w/loads of Cabinets, lots of solid surface counters, Stainless Steel appliances, Gas cooking. 13' Dining w/Glass slider opening to Sun Splashed deck. Inviting & Large 20' Livingrm. Open Entertaining floor plan,. Soaring Skylite staircase leading to Huge 17' Master Bedrm and King Size 2nd bedrm. Full bath w/Newly updated tiled floors, toilet, tub & designer tiled wall. Tiled 1/2 bath w/New toilet. Finished lower level bonus room with custom wood walls, shelving (home office, exercise room) Washer & Gas Dryer. Updated Gas heating & Quality Lenox Central air conditioning. Loads of storage plus attic storage. All Gas Townhome, heat, hotwater, cooking & dryer. Deep garage, extra storage, auto opener. Tennis Courts, duck pond. Commuter Dream location, min. to Train & Highway. Near shopping & State Park. Top Schools

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